Mental Health Parity Collaborative

The Mental Health Parity Collaborative is a partnership between The Carter Center’s Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism, The Center for Public Integrity, and news outlets in Arizona, California, Georgia, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Texas, and the District of Columbia. More than 40 reporters and editors are working to produce data- and solutions-driven stories that examine access to mental health care in their states and why mental health parity hasn’t been achieved.  

©Shutterstock/GrAI

The numbers show that we’re in crisis...

in 5
U.S. Adults experience mental illness each year
million
More than half of U.S. adults with a mental illness don’t receive treatment—a number that has been on the rise since 2011.
in 10 people
who struggle with mental illnesses have no health insurance
%
of children experiencing major depression are not receiving care.

Though stigma still shrouds awareness of mental health issues, they are pervasive and have serious implications, putting people at high risk for suicide and crisis. This situation has been exacerbated further by the Covid-19 pandemic, with new data indicating increasing rates of depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation, and national shortages of counselors and therapists. 

In The News

©Kylie Cooper/The Texas Tribune: Dana Jones pauses for a moment on Aug. 1, 2022, as she retells her experiences with past floods in Houston. Hurricane Harvey in 2017, Tropical Storm Imelda in 2019 and Winter Storm Uri in 2021 damaged her home.

“It’s destroying me”: Storm after storm, climate change increases strain on Texans’ mental health

©Brandon Quester/AZCIR: Students pass through open walkways in this file photo of a high school in Tempe, Arizona on Aug. 27, 2021

Youth access to mental health care improved under Jake’s Law, but persistent barriers hamper its reach

©Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune: Meena Thiruvengadam, of Chicago, on July 20, 2022, has to pay out-of-pocket for therapy because her therapist does not accept health insurance.

Why is it so hard to find therapists who take insurance in Illinois?

©Shutterstock/megaflopp

How Georgia’s new mental health law works