From Our Newsroom Partners

©Sipa USA/Joshua Guerra/Sipa USA via Reuters.: Twenty one chairs, flags and crosses are displayed in front of local businesses on May 30, 2022, in Uvalde. They each honor the 19 students and two teachers killed in a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde.

Uvalde prompted Texas to start taking mental health funding for schools seriously. Is it enough?

Texas Public Radio, by Bonnie Petrie, September 27, 2022:  [Petrie Dish Podcast] On a sweet, sunny spring Tuesday, children across the state were preparing for summer break, feeling that giddy rush that comes to kids in those last, loose days of the school year when unstructured hours of summer fun…

©Annie Mulligan/The Texas Tribune: Devin Mathieu and his partner, Claudia Dambra, discuss someone who might need a package containing life-saving harm reduction supplies in their apartment on Sept. 16.

Texas bans many proven tools for helping drug users. Advocates are handing them out anyway.

The Texas Tribune, by Sneha Dey, October 11, 2022: HOUSTON — Thirty minutes before a punk show this summer, Claudia Dambra set up a table and taped to it a tablecloth she had hand-painted with broad, white brushstrokes. The banner read, “PUNK NOT DEATH.” As people flooded into the Houston…

©Kylie Cooper/The Texas Tribune: Dana Jones pauses for a moment on Aug. 1, 2022, as she retells her experiences with past floods in Houston. Hurricane Harvey in 2017, Tropical Storm Imelda in 2019 and Winter Storm Uri in 2021 damaged her home.

“It’s destroying me”: Storm after storm, climate change increases strain on Texans’ mental health

The Texas Tribune, September 8, 2022, by Erin Douglas: HOUSTON — The first thing Dana Jones, 61, tells you to do when you enter her gray-blue house in Melrose Park is walk along the off-white tile, up and down, through her dining room, while she watches carefully for your reaction….

©Dan Carino

There’s Free Mental Health Help For Crime Victims, But Providers Say Bureaucracy Gets In The Way

SCPR/KPCC, Sep 9, 2022, by Robert Garrova: About three years ago, a Southern California resident we’ll call Jane —we’re not using her real name because of a pending trial and security concerns— and her husband found out their child had been assaulted. “Your world is rocked. We couldn’t sleep for…

©Brandon Quester/AZCIR: Students pass through open walkways in this file photo of a high school in Tempe, Arizona on Aug. 27, 2021

Youth access to mental health care improved under Jake’s Law, but persistent barriers hamper its reach

Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting (AZCIR), September 1, 2022, by Shaena Montanari and Maria Polletta:  In March 2020, Gov. Doug Ducey signed into law a sweeping set of measures designed to help curb rising rates of suicide and expand access to mental health treatment for Arizona residents with and without…

©Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune: Meena Thiruvengadam, of Chicago, on July 20, 2022, has to pay out-of-pocket for therapy because her therapist does not accept health insurance.

Why is it so hard to find therapists who take insurance in Illinois?

Chicago Tribune, August 21, 2022, by Lisa Schencker: Meena Thiruvengadam faced a choice when her therapist stopped taking health insurance about a year ago. She could try to find someone else who would take her insurance, or she could pay her therapist — whom she trusted and had already been…

©Shutterstock/megaflopp

How Georgia’s new mental health law works

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, August 3, 2022, by Katherine Landergan: There’s a new law on the books that should make accessing treatment for mental illness and addiction much easier. But some proponents of the new law fear that many Georgia residents may not know about the change. That means patients could…

©Riley Bunch/GPB News: Stephanie Basey, a doctoral student at Mercer University School of Medicine, presents findings on the mental health of Georgia's farmers at a summit in Tifton on May 18. Industry experts seek to get resources to farmers, who don't always know where to turn for help.

How researchers are getting farmers to talk about mental health

Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB), August 9, 2022, by Riley Bunch: Christina Proctor spent many hours during her childhood on the front porches of neighborhood farms in Madison County. She had a rough upbringing, she said, and lived in a house scarred by substance abuse. “But we lived on this road…

©Riley Bunch/GPB News: North Georgia farmer Drew Echols picks peaches in his field on July 11, 2022, at Jaemor Farms in Alto, Ga. Echols is from a line of farmers who, until recently, generally remained silent about mental health amid the stressors of farming. But experts are seeking to change that.

Farmers have silently struggled with their mental health for years. Are they ready to talk?

Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB), August 9, 2022, by Riley Bunch: Drew Echols doesn’t remember ever talking with his father about mental health. Or his grandfather. In fact, he doesn’t remember the last time he talked about his mental health at all. “We talked about work a whole lot more than…

©Ellen Eldridge/GPB News: Brent Moore is the founder of Redeemed Living, a faith-based nonprofit for men in addiction recovery. The group seeks to build transitional housing for men in recovery on a 23-acre site, but neighboring residents are against the effort.

It’s the most important part of addiction recovery — and often the most difficult to access

Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB), August 4, 2022, by Ellen Eldridge: Residents in rural South Georgia are adamantly fighting a zoning request — a faith-based nonprofit called Redeemed Living wants to build cabins for men in addiction recovery on 23 acres of local farmland. But the neighbors don’t want them living…

©Alborz Kamalizad/LAist: “I had all these flashes of something really awful happening either to my son while I was gone or to myself while I was driving,” one mom said as she recalled having a panic attack after birthing her son in the summer of 2020.

Why The Pandemic Took An Especially High Mental Health Toll On New Parents

KPCC, July 26, 2022, by Elly Yu: About six weeks after she gave birth to her son in the summer of 2020, Erin Sricharoon was driving to her local Starbucks in Yucaipa to get an iced chai latte when she had to pull over. “I had all these flashes of…

©Alborz Kamalizad/LAist

CARE Court Aims To Help People Living With Serious Mental Illnesses. Would It Bring New Solutions Or More Problems?

KPCC, July 20, 2022, by Robert Garrova: There’s a bill making its way through the state legislature that aims to create new avenues for people living with a serious mental illness to get life-saving treatment. The plan, first introduced by Governor Gavin Newsom in the spring, is called the Community…

©Roswell Gray/Roswell Gray, who's 17, has been troubled by the way Texas leaders have targeted gender-affirming care in the state. "I do wish that people would understand that trans youth aren't trying to harm anyone," Gray said. "It's not part of some like, secret agenda. It's just who we are."

For trans youth in North Texas, finding affirming mental health care can be a challenge

KERA, July 21, 2022, by Elena Rivera: Texas leaders have targeted trans youth, their families and gender-affirming care practices for months. It’s exacerbated feelings of anxiety and fear in trans youth, who already experience higher rates of depression, anxiety and suicide than their cis peers. Mental health practitioners can help…

©Isaac Stone Simonelli | AZCIR: Zoe Edelstein, 13, poses for a photo in her family's home in Phoenix on July 17, 2022. Edelstein switched to online learning because she experienced severe anxiety after returning to in-person learning this past school year.

Permanent funding solution elusive as mental health provider shortage plagues Arizona schools—and students

Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting (AZCIR), July 21, 2022, by Maria Polletta and Shaena Montanari: At times, seventh grade felt like one long string of panic attacks to Zoe Edelstein. The Phoenix student, who’d been living with anxiety and panic disorder since early elementary school, had started in-person at a…

Christina Gerlach is a crisis services manager at UnityPlace, a Living Room managed by UnityPoint Health in Peoria, Illinois

Amidst a lack of mental health services, the ‘Living Room’ approach aims to plug gaps

Side Effects Public Media, July 13, 2022, by Carter Barrett: After a bad breakup, 19-year-old Benjamin Kowalczyk said everything felt like it was crumbling around him. He dropped out of college, and felt himself getting angry with his family. “I had fallen into a bad depression state,” said Kowalczyk, who…

Nova Jaswan lost the tip of her middle finger when a cell door at Fulton County Jail closed on her hand.
Credit: Ellen Eldridge/GPB News

With few other resources, people with behavioral health issues find treatment in jails and prisons

Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB), July 8, 2022, by Ellen Eldridge: Nova Jaswan would like to stop using cocaine. And she’d like help with some of the other issues that feed into why she uses cocaine. “I’m schizoaffective; I have PTSD and I have mood disorder NOS — not otherwise specified,”…

©Adobe Stock/Photo illustration: Natasha Vicens/PublicSource

PA’s controversial mental health law on involuntary treatment stands to get a test run more than 3 years after its passing.

PublicSource, July 5, 2022, by Juliette Rihl: Paul and Christine, of Montgomery County, know what it feels like to helplessly watch their child’s mental health deteriorate. After two hospitalizations in 2020 and 2021 for mental health crises, their 30-year-old son stopped taking his medication and following other aspects of his…

©Bobbi Wiseman/Memorial Health: Barbara Wheatley takes phone calls as part of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Network. Wheatley is an alcohol and substance abuse counselor and the lead clinician for mobile crisis response for Memorial Behavioral Health in Springfield, Illinois.

A new national mental health crisis line launches soon. Some states aren’t ready.

Side Effects Public Media, June 13, 2022, by Carter Barrett: Staff at Memorial Behavioral Health in Springfield, Illinois, are on call around the clock to talk with people struggling with suicidal thoughts, drug addiction or other mental health crises. They provide a listening ear and help connect people to resources…

©Clare Sheedy/PublicSource: Elaine Houston sits in her East Liberty home where she takes her remote telehealth appointments.

PA eased telehealth regulations during the pandemic. What happens if the waiver expires?

PublicSource, June 9, 2022, by Jourdan Hicks: At first, the pandemic actually kept us in our homes. Y’all remember that? Being on lockdown? For many, COVID and the response to it only intensified the need for health care. And by health care, I mean physical and mental. But have the…

©Riley Bunch/GPB: News Officers from law enforcement departments that have already implemented co-responder units gather at the Georgia Capitol on May 9 to watch Gov. Brian Kemp sign Senate Bill 403.

Law enforcement enlists mental health experts to help save lives — ‘a paradigm shift in policing’

Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB), June 8, 2022, by Riley Bunch: SAVANNAH, Georgia — Sometimes when Savannah Police Department officers are called to a scene of a crisis, those who respond may not look like police at all. Officers arrive in an unmarked Ford Explorer, donning a simple blue polo and…