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Rosalynn Carter Journalism Fellowship Program offers free online course on responsible mental health reporting and journalists’ self-care

By Susan Whisnant Since its inception in 1996, the Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism program has been training a select group of reporters each year in Atlanta (or virtually during the pandemic) on how to report accurately and sensitively on mental health topics. Now, journalists taking care of…

©Bobbi Wiseman/Memorial Health: Barbara Wheatley takes phone calls as part of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Network. Wheatley is an alcohol and substance abuse counselor and the lead clinician for mobile crisis response for Memorial Behavioral Health in Springfield, Illinois.

A new national mental health crisis line launches soon. Some states aren’t ready.

Side Effects Public Media, June 13, 2022, by Carter Barrett: Staff at Memorial Behavioral Health in Springfield, Illinois, are on call around the clock to talk with people struggling with suicidal thoughts, drug addiction or other mental health crises. They provide a listening ear and help connect people to resources…

©Clare Sheedy/PublicSource: Elaine Houston sits in her East Liberty home where she takes her remote telehealth appointments.

PA eased telehealth regulations during the pandemic. What happens if the waiver expires?

PublicSource, June 9, 2022, by Jourdan Hicks: At first, the pandemic actually kept us in our homes. Y’all remember that? Being on lockdown? For many, COVID and the response to it only intensified the need for health care. And by health care, I mean physical and mental. But have the…

©Riley Bunch/GPB: News Officers from law enforcement departments that have already implemented co-responder units gather at the Georgia Capitol on May 9 to watch Gov. Brian Kemp sign Senate Bill 403.

Law enforcement enlists mental health experts to help save lives — ‘a paradigm shift in policing’

Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB), June 8, 2022, by Riley Bunch: SAVANNAH, Georgia — Sometimes when Savannah Police Department officers are called to a scene of a crisis, those who respond may not look like police at all. Officers arrive in an unmarked Ford Explorer, donning a simple blue polo and…

Latha Wright, a 16-year-old Atlanta student, says mental health is misunderstood. She posed for a portrait in her home on May 25, 2022. ©Arvin Temkar/AJC

Georgia students’ private battle: Anxiety disorders in the classroom

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 1, 2022, by Vanessa McCray and Eric Stirgus: Latha Wright studies Latin, draws her own comics and films videos with her little brother. The 16-year-old Atlanta student also battles anxiety. When her family sought help, they encountered obstacles that make it difficult for many Georgia teens…

McKinley Reid, Audrianna Guerrero and Sydney Judge are all part of Girl Scout Troop 5596. They started working on activities for their Okay to Say mental health badge in April. "We were learning about stress and empathy and gratitude," Judge explained. ©Trevon McWilliams/KERA

The Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas are tackling mental health, one patch at a time

KERA, May 19, 2022, by Elena Rivera: The COVID-19 pandemic worsened stress, anxiety and depression for young people—especially young girls. Those are things the Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas have addressed through their mental health patch, called Okay to Say. It’s one part of a wider prevention effort to mitigate…

Kayode Martin, center, participates in a spiritual reflection group session at an Inner-City Muslim Action Network facility in Chicago Lawn on March 2, 2022. ©Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune

In a pandemic, people might know they need food or housing. But how do you help them realize they also need therapy?

Chicago Tribune March 30, 2022 By Alison Bowen As the pandemic wore on, Kayode Martin felt stuck. He’d graduated virtually, a high school senior when COVID-19 arrived in Chicago. A year later, in 2021, he was working at a store but struggling to find a routine that felt on good…

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Mental health care at work: Roundup of recent research on employee assistance programs

The Journalist’s Resource, Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, Harvard University May 24, 2022 Insurance makes seeking mental health care more affordable for those who have it, but workers often have access to an additional form of help at no cost: employee assistance programs. By Clark Merrefield The…

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Achieving mental health parity: The struggle to get insurance plans to improve coverage of mental health care

The Journalist’s Resource, Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, Harvard University May 11, 2022 Insurance companies have failed to follow a federal law that expands access to mental health treatments. But many factors, including clinician shortages, also affect progress. By Denise-Marie Ordway In a 54-page report to Congress…

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Racial disparities in mental health care: An explainer and research roundup

The Journalist’s Resource, Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, Harvard University May 18, 2022 Little has changed since the office of the U.S. Surgeon General issued a report on mental health disparities two decades ago. Persisting structural racism is one of the key drivers of disparities but experts…